Blog Entries

By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 13 September 2018

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus is the feline equivalent of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Once your cat contracts the virus, it may go undetected for years.

 

What is the health risk of FIV?

FIV compromises your cat's immune system so that everyday exposure to what should be harmless viruses, bacteria, and fungi can cause serious illnesses. FIV positive cats can live with the virus for approximately five years once diagnosed. 

 

Cats most at risk of contracting the virus are undesexed, unvaccinated cats who go outdoors. The most effective ways to transmit the virus is to be bitten by a cat infected with the virus. Indoor cats are much less likely to become infected.


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 13 September 2018

In Australia, we have a number of snakes inhabiting areas where people (and their pets) live. There are a few ways that you can try to prevent a snake biting your pet and there are some tips that will help you identify if your furry friend has been bitten, and act quickly to minimise the likelihood of death or permanent injury. 

 

The good news is that most snakes want to stay clear of you and your pet. So, while you may have been near one, you would never know. The bad news is that dogs and cats (and other domestic animals) are very curious hunters and they may pursue a snake, which can result in a snake reacting and biting your pet in self-defence.


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 23 August 2018

High on the list of the many cringeworthy things we hope not to hear at a visit to the doctor is, “I’ll need a urine sample”, but we accept it as something that’s important in the diagnosis of potential problems and compliantly retreat to the toilet, plastic jar in hand. Our pets’ doctors also recognise the importance of pee in the provision of invaluable health insights, and without it illnesses can progress and are sometimes too late to treat by the time symptoms become apparent.

This simple and affordable test provides the opportunity for your vet to check the health of your pet’s kidneys and urinary system and look for other problems in their organs as well as signs of metabolic disease. An animal may appear completely healthy and not exhibit any signs of discomfort or issues until they have gone beyond the point where the disease is treatable. An annual urinalysis can catch difficult-to-detect diseases in their earliest stages and they can be an important way to ensure that your pet is healthy and disease-free. 


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 14 August 2018

Most of us are familiar with microchips. They’re used for a variety of purposes including creating a permanent form of identification for pets.

Collars and tags can still be effective, but some animals don’t like wearing them, and there’s always the chance they can come off and be lost. Also, relying on this method means that if your contacts details change, you need to remember to get a new tag engraved.

Are microchips foolproof?

The effectiveness of microchips lies in accurate information being recorded against the chip, and people who find a lost animal getting the chip details checked. Of course, people may still respond to a notice that the lost pet’s owner has placed in various media, but microchips are one of the simplest and most effective ways of reuniting lost pets with their owners.

Often, we don’t think about our pet going missing until it happens, and it does… even with indoor pets. They can run away from a sitter, escape while you’re entertaining, or bolt during fireworks or a thunderstorm. Thousands of pets go missing every year, and sadly, many owners never find them. Minimise the risk of becoming one of them, by microchipping your pet and keeping your details up to date.

 

Don’t forget also, that microchipping of dogs and cats is now compulsory in South Australia. If you have any questions about microchipping, want to get your pet chipped, or you need to obtain your pet’s microchip number, please get in touch.

 


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 7 August 2018

When the 8-hour working day was legislated in Australia in 1948, it didn’t include dogs, and we’re certainly lucky it didn’t. Being intelligent, loyal, and hardworking animals, dogs are suitable for many roles in addition to human companionship, and one of the areas in which they are used extensively is service. There are a variety of roles in which our canine friends excel, and they include assistance, rescue, and even lifesaving. Following are some occupations in which dogs have been working alongside us throughout history.


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 21 June 2018

Taking dogs to work isn’t something that’s common in Australia, except perhaps in some small privately-owned businesses like the local service station or hardware store. Some restaurants and cafes now cater for patrons to brings their dogs, but they’re still somewhat of a rarity, and the “no-dogs allowed” policy is still fairly strictly adhered-to in most businesses. There are businesses where, for reasons of hygiene, it’s logical that pets shouldn’t be allowed, but is Australia behind the times when it comes to allowing companion animals to accompany their owners to work and other public places?

 

It’s not uncommon to see dogs in restaurants in some of the most sophisticated and large European cities, and surprisingly some very large dogs can be found in some of the tiniest and cramped cafes. Most are so well behaved that you don’t realise they’re there, until a Great Dane rises to its feet and accompanies its owner past your table when leaving. So, why is it less common in South Australian workplaces? It’s often to do with the absence of a clearly articulated policy so that both pet owners’ and other workers’ interests are protected. It also relies on the dog-owners being respectful of the impact their animal has on others – regardless of policy -  and in making sure that co-workers are comfortable sharing their space with a canine colleague.

 

There is evidence to suggest that having dogs in the workplace can help to lower stress and in some cases an even lead to increased productivity, but if you’re thinking of bringing your pooch to work there are some things you need to bear in mind. Following are some do’s and don’ts of dogs in the workplace.


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 19 April 2018

Dogs are the perfect place for worms and parasites to live, and their habit of licking, sniffing and eating almost anything they find, means that there’s a high chance they’re going to come into contact them. Once they’re onboard there’s a bunch of things dogs also do that help them to be spread, such as, licking, grooming, and kissing… yes kissing, and we’re at risk as well as other dogs.

 

Dogs are therefore likely to encounter worms at some point, and there a variety of types of worms, each creating different dangers. Most, such as hookworms, tapeworms, whipworm, and roundworm live in dogs’ intestines. Heartworm, as the name suggests, live in dogs’ hearts and lungs. So, what’s the difference between them and how can they be prevented?


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 19 April 2018

This week we’re covering a subject that is actually more about us than animals… dog bites and dog attacks, and how to avoid them. Being bitten can be traumatic, and anyone who’s been chased or lunged at by an aggressive dog will tell you how terrifying it can be. To know how to best handle these situations, trying to understand the dog’s perspective can help, however that can be difficult when you’re scared and feeling threatened. The ultimate objective when dealing with an aggressive dog is of course not to get bitten, and following are some tips on how to achieve this.

 

What influences dog attacks?

Firstly, let’s look at the circumstances surrounding dog attacks. There is ongoing debate about the extent to which dog breed influences the likelihood of attack on humans, but it is a complex issue. There is no definitive study of dog bites by breed, because the number of attacks by a breed increases in proportion to the popularity of that breed. In reducing the incidence of attacks there are many preventable factors much more significant than breed. 


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 14 March 2018

We often only notice our dogs’ nails when they’re getting a bit too long, and it can be easy to forget them until we can hear them clicking on a hard floor while they’re walking. Even the most loving and dedicated dog owners can be unsure of the correct way to trim nails, and the job can sometimes be a little challenging, especially if your dog doesn’t like nail clipping time. In this article we aim to demystify the art of nail-clipping, and help you with some simple tips.

 

No acrylics here…

Dogs’ nails, like horses’, come in different colours and it’s usually determined by the colour of the surrounding skin and hair, therefore dark fur is usually accompanied by dark nails and white fur with white nails. Some dogs have bi-coloured nails, and nail colour can sometimes change as well. Changing colour is usually due to a harmless change in the pigment, but it can sometimes be a sign of a health problem, therefore if your dog’s nails change colour, you should bring it to the attention of your vet.


By Vets4Pets Veterinarians in Adelaide on 14 March 2018

In our grandparents’ day chickens were commonly kept in residential backyards, but the growth of the poultry industry and the mass production of eggs, led to a decline in its popularity. These days however, as people are looking for healthier alternatives to supermarket-supplied, processed, and mass-produced foods, there is an increasing interest in keeping chooks. Even for those of us in the city, could they in fact be an egg-cellent pet?

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